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Archive for February, 2014

I’m over at Slip Into Something Victorian today with my latest Civil War timeline post. A major Union cavalry raid on Virginia 150 years ago today.

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Today is action week, so I’m posting an action scene from my American-Victorian romance, The Physician’s Irish Lady.

Excerpt:
thephysiciansirishlady_w8189_750Elliot fumed as the man related his story to Jim. How could he talk about the woman he loved as property? Of course, although his claim seemed valid, Elliot couldn’t imagine taking a woman by force, even a wife.

“I’m sorry, Mr. Morrissey, but if you have no proof, and she’s not willing to go with you, you’ll have to leave. If you return with absolute proof, I’ll be willing to allow you to take her.”

Morrissey’s face reddened. “I’d have to go all the way back to New York! And if the papers aren’t there, what am I to do?”

Jim spread his arms. “I can’t help you, sir.

Rogan growled and lunged at Jim. Elliot sprang into action and yanked him off. Andy drew his pistol and leveled it at the enraged Irishman. Morrissey froze.

“Want me to lock him up?” the deputy asked Jim.

Jim eyed the Irishman. “If he leaves willingly with no more trouble, I’ll allow him to go. But you’d best not return to my town, Mister.”

Morrissey backed toward the door, his hands raised. “I’ll leave, Sheriff.” He turned to Elliot. “But I promise you, Doctor, so long as you have me wife under yer roof, you’d best be on yer guard.”

“We don’t take kindly to threats here, Morrissey,” Jim growled. “Get on your way and don’t stop until you’re out of my town.”

The Irishman nodded and stepped out the door, but not without a final backward scowl at Elliot.

He blew out the breath he’d been holding as the door closed behind the man. Andy strode to the window and peered out.

“Is he leaving?” Jim asked stepping to his deputy’s side.

“Yes, sir.” Andy nodded. “He’s got a wagon outside. He’s driving off.”

Jim patted Elliot on the shoulder. “You’d best watch your back, Doc, and keep your house secure. We’ll be on the lookout as well.” He nodded toward Andy.

Elliot’s blood chilled. “Do you think he’ll stay around town after your warning?”

Jim nodded. “If she is his wife, or he just wants to lay claim to her for whatever reason, I don’t think he’ll go quietly.”

Susan Macatee has written a lovely story of redemption and trust, set in the immediate years following the Civil War. She has a good eye for detail and character development. I recommend this book to anyone who likes historical tales of determined women. ~ Amazon customer review

Blurb:
Keara Fagan is falsely accused of insurrection against the British and sentenced to indentured servitude in Australia. The Irish native escapes on a ship bound for America with no money and the clothes on her back. Now, she must stay on the run while trying to survive in a strange land.

As Dr. Elliot James travels by train from Philadelphia to York, a young woman faints at his feet. He’s sworn, as a physician, to aid the sick and injured, but fears this woman needs more than medical help. Enchanted by her beauty and touched by her dignity, he buys her a meal and offers her a place to stay in his small Pennsylvania town.

But a mysterious Irishman pursues her to the idyllic town surrounded by scenic farmland. Is he the abusive husband come to claim his runaway wife, or someone more sinister?

Available from The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=195&products_id=5497

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/The-Physicians-Irish-Lady-ebook/dp/B00FDXQ684/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1380111260&sr=1-1&keywords=the+physician%27s+irish+lady

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-physicians-irish-lady-susan-macatee/1118163850?ean=2940148243137

and All Romance Ebooks https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thephysician039sirishlady-1401248-158.html

humpdayhook
http://humpdayhook.blogspot.co.uk/

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My new release, The Physician’s Irish Lady, features an Irish immigrant heroine as well as a villain who preys on new immigrants coming into port in New York City. Also, my full-length published romances, Erin’s Rebel and Confederate Rose, the book my new release is based on, feature Irish immigrants at the time of the Civil War. Many Irish fought on both sides of this conflict, during a time period when so many left Ireland to escape starvation and oppression.

Both England and America experienced a large influx of Irish immigrants during the Victorian era. While some of this was due to the potato famine, a great deal of the problem began back in the mid-17th century, when Oliver Cromwell invaded Ireland. Landowners who refused to give up Catholicism had their property confiscated and given to members of the English Army.

“Between 1841 and 1851, Ireland’s population of 8 million had dwindled down to 6 million. An estimated half of these people left the country while the other million died.”

One million emigrated to England and America, overwhelming both countries. American saw this surge of immigration between 1815 and 1845. The Irish had few technical skills, but were healthy and strong. They became a much needed source of cheap labor.

In England “. . . The Irish lived on the absolute fringes of Victorian society . . .”  They became unskilled day laborers and street peddlers.

” . . . Thomas Malthus, noted English economist explained the earlier famines and starvation in Ireland as God’s answer to overpopulation of those who refuse to show constraint . . .”

” . . . emigrating to America was not a joyful event . . . They left in droves on ships that were crowded, with conditions so terrible, that they were referred to as Coffin Ships.” http://www.kinsella.org/history/histira.htm

English oppression had made their country unlivable for them. Their only hope was to escape. Poor immigrants were forced to settle in their port of arrival, having no means of moving on.

The offers of free land out west during this time period meant little to the Irish. The land back in Ireland had failed them, so they looked to other means of making a living in their new country.Although the Irish immigrants arriving in America had come to escape hunger and oppression, they found that life for them didn’t change all that much.

By the height of the potato famine, an Irish immigrant wrote home saying that, “My master is a great tyrant, he treats me as badly as if I was a common Irishman. Our position is one of shame and poverty.” http://kinsella.org/history/histira.htm

Signs for employment were often followed by: “NO IRISH NEED APPLY”. The new immigrants had to live in cellars and shanties. Their brogue and dress were ridiculed. They were also held up to scorn for their poverty and illiteracy.

The Irish held together and met intimidation with violence. Prayer and drink solidified them, helping them to survive life in the city. One newspaper was led to say about them, “The Irish have become more Americanized than the Americans.” http://www.kinsella.org/history/histira.htm

“The Church played an integral part in their lives. It was a militant Church who fought not only for their souls but also for their human rights.” http://kinsella.org/history/histira.htm

America needed the Irish. Men were needed for the heavy work of building bridges, canals and railroads. Women worked as maids, cooks and child caretakers. Irish immigrants needed these jobs to survive and they proved to be hard workers.

Although they never forgot their homeland, the Irish loved America. But they never lost their hatred of the English. This led them to rebel against anything they saw as oppression on the part of their new country. “In New York City during the Civil War, they rioted against the draft lottery after the first drawing showed most of the names were Irish.” http://www.kinsella.org/history/histira.htm http://www.civilwarhome.com/draftriots.htm

The Irish, who’d suffered brutality back in Ireland at English hands were fierce warriors. They used brutal methods to fight back against the oppression of mine owners in Pennsylvania, forming a secret organization called the Molly Maguires. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molly_Maguires They also formed their own Irish Brigade during the Civil War. http://www.civilwarhome.com/irishbri.htm http://irishvolunteers.tripod.com/irish_brigade_history.htm

As new immigrants of other nationalities later came to American shores, the Irish were finally hailed as an asset. They were fully Americanized. Hostility shifted to these new immigrants. The Irish finally found power and acceptance.

“In 1850 at the height of the Potato Famine, Orestes Brownson, a celebrated convert to Catholicism, stated, ‘Out of these narrow lanes, dirty streets, damp cellars, and suffocating garrets, will come forth some of the noblest sons of our country, whom she will delight to own and honor.’ ” http://www.kinsella.org/history/histira.htm

The Physician’s Irish Lady is available from The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=195&products_id=5497

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/The-Physicians-Irish-Lady-ebook/dp/B00FDXQ684/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1380111260&sr=1-1&keywords=the+physician%27s+irish+lady

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-physicians-irish-lady-susan-macatee/1118163850?ean=2940148243137

and All Romance Ebooks https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thephysician039sirishlady-1401248-158.html

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Next installment in the opening chapter of my time travel romance.

Excerpt:
ThoroughlyModernAmanda_w7277_750Randolph sighed and stood. He glanced toward the door, obviously hoping his other employees hadn’t caught him groveling. “I don’t want you to be angry with me. In fact, I have a surprise for you.”

Amanda shrugged. Though intrigued, she didn’t want to let on that he’d snagged her attention.

“After we close the office tonight, I’ll take you to dinner, and then I’ll show you my surprise.”

“I don’t know.” Amanda glanced at her hands. “My father would be upset if we don’t have a chaperone.” She looked up. “Or would we?”

“Amanda…” He sighed. “I care a great deal about you and would never harm or compromise you.” He stepped close and lifted her chin. His dark eyes held hers. “It’s a present…for you.”

“But must we wait until after dinner to see it?” She frowned.

Thoroughly Modern Amanda is available from The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=176_135&products_id=5074

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Thoroughly-Modern-Amanda-ebook/dp/B00AQAIHHW/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355948640&sr=1-1&keywords=Thoroughy+Modern+Amanda

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thoroughly-modern-amanda-susan-macatee/1114008539?ean=2940016112596

All Romance Ebooks https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thoroughlymodernamanda-1026307-141.html

And now in print http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=191&products_id=5346

http://sneak-peek-sunday.blogspot.com/

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While I’m constantly searching and hoping for reviews for my newer releases, I was pleasantly surprised to find a new review for one of my 2012 releases, Civil War romance, Cole’s Promise.

ColesPromise_6889_680Cole’s Promise is part of The Wild Rose Press’ ‘Love Letters’ series. A series of historical romances released over time on a regular basis that year. The requirement to be included in the series was that one of the characters had to receive a letter that changed their lives. In the case of my story, the hero, Cole Manning, a lieutenant in the Union army, received a letter from his best girl telling him she was marrying another man.

The other requirement was that the story had to be short.

Here’s a quote from the reviewer:
“Cole and Clare only have brief encounters in the field since he’s a Lieutenant and she’s a field nurse. They do have chemistry from the first and it’s enjoyable to see how they both handle it. There’s battles, casualties including dead and wounded, doctors and nurses, love and letters… An enjoyable read but too short for me. I will give some of the author’s other books a try.”

For the full review: http://romancing-the-book.com/2014/01/coles-promise-by-susan-macatee.html

4 1/2 hearts at The Romance Studio http://www.theromancestudio.com/reviews/reviews/colepromisemacatee.htm

Cole’s Promise
available at The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=176_135&products_id=4821

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Coles-Promise-Love-Letters-ebook/dp/B007VRKQ04/ref=sr_1_4?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1334931371&sr=1-4

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1110282244?ean=2940014529969

All Romance Ebooks http://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-cole039spromise-780707-158.html

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thephysiciansirishlady_w8189_750Keara sat at the kitchen table wringing her hands while the dinner cooled outside on the dining table. She feared Dr. James would take Rogan’s side and turn her over to him. After all, men stuck together.

Millie sat beside her and reached for her hands. “Don’t fret so, dear.” She leaned forward. “I told you I had a dream about a man chasing you.”

Keara shook her head. “I don’t understand why he would come after me. I don’t know the man. Never laid eyes on him in me life.” She gazed at Millie fearing the clairvoyant woman would see the lie in Keara’s eyes. But she couldn’t tell her, tell any of them, the truth.

Footsteps echoed outside the kitchen. Keara tensed, fearing Dr. James would appear with Rogan to lay claim to her. But he had no legal right to her. She lifted her fist to cover her mouth.

Dr. James entered the kitchen, Rogan nowhere in sight.

Keara trembled, hoping the doctor had seen through Rogan’s lies.

“What happened out there, Elliot?” his aunt asked. “Miss Fagan is visibly upset and a bit pale.” She gazed at Keara, patting her hand.

Elliot sighed. He sank into one of the vacant chairs. When his gaze rose to meet Keara’s, she fought the urge to turn away in shame.

“The man at the door is an Irishman from New York City. He claims…” He hesitated. “He claims Miss Fagan is his wife, and he’s come to bring her home.”

Keara’s face heated, and she clasped her hands in her lap. “I told you, the man is lying. I’ve never laid eyes on him before.”

Dr. James frowned. “Makes it all the more puzzling, Miss Fagan.”

“Why is that?” Millie asked.

“Why, he knows her name and knows I escorted her from the train in York.” He turned his gaze on Keara. “If you’ve never seen him before, how would he know all this?”

Keara tensed, not sure what she could say to convince him.

Millie leaned forward, reaching for her nephew’s hand. “The man is evil, Elliot. You mustn’t allow him to take Keara. You must protect her.”

Susan Macatee has written a lovely story of redemption and trust, set in the immediate years following the Civil War. She has a good eye for detail and character development. I recommend this book to anyone who likes historical tales of determined women. ~ Amazon customer review

Blurb:
Keara Fagan is falsely accused of insurrection against the British and sentenced to indentured servitude in Australia. The Irish native escapes on a ship bound for America with no money and the clothes on her back. Now, she must stay on the run while trying to survive in a strange land.

As Dr. Elliot James travels by train from Philadelphia to York, a young woman faints at his feet. He’s sworn, as a physician, to aid the sick and injured, but fears this woman needs more than medical help. Enchanted by her beauty and touched by her dignity, he buys her a meal and offers her a place to stay in his small Pennsylvania town.

But a mysterious Irishman pursues her to the idyllic town surrounded by scenic farmland. Is he the abusive husband come to claim his runaway wife, or someone more sinister?

Available from The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=195&products_id=5497

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/The-Physicians-Irish-Lady-ebook/dp/B00FDXQ684/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1380111260&sr=1-1&keywords=the+physician%27s+irish+lady

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-physicians-irish-lady-susan-macatee/1118163850?ean=2940148243137

and All Romance Ebooks https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thephysician039sirishlady-1401248-158.html

humpdayhook
http://humpdayhook.blogspot.co.uk/

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My newest historical romance, The Physician’s Irish Lady, takes place in the years just after the American Civil War. The heroine is an Irish immigrant, alone and on the run from a man trying to install her in a New York brothel.The man tries to lay claim to her by pretending she’s his wife. In this time period, a woman’s husband was considered a master she was expected to obey.

The nineteenth century was a tumultuous time for the establishment of women’s rights, as women fought for their freedom at the same time many men sought to hold them back.

In 1870, the 15th Amendment gave voting rights to all men, including blacks, but women were excluded.

In 1845, a female reporter, Margaret Fuller, wrote ‘Women in the Nineteenth Century’. She insisted that “individuals had unlimited capacities and that when people’s roles were defined according to their sex, human development was severely limited”.

During the 19th century, women in the United States both organized and participated in many types of reform movements. They sought to improve education, initiate prison reform and ban alcoholic drinks; and in the pre-Civil War period, rallied to free the slaves.

In this time period, a woman speaking before a mixed audience, was frowned upon. But abolitionist sisters, Sarah and Angelina Grimke from South Carolina, spoke out against slavery in public meetings. A few of the male abolitionists, notably, William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips and Frederick Douglass were supportive of women speaking and participating in antislavery activities.

Women compared their position with that of slaves. Women and slaves were supposed to remain “passive, cooperative and obedient to their master-husbands”. Many feminists were also abolitionists, including Stanton, Lucy Stone, Lucretia Mott, Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth.

Dorothea Dix led a movement for prison reform in the mid 1800s. She also worked to provide mental-hospital care for the needy.

In July 1848 the first women’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, N. Y. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote that “all men and women are created equal” and that “the history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman”.

Women abolitionists were disappointed after the Union victory in the Civil War. They’d hoped the fight for freedom for blacks would also help advance women’s rights. However, the 14th and 15th Amendments granted citizenship and suffrage to black men, but women, whatever their color, were excluded.

Women finally did win the right to vote, but it was long hard struggle. Although women in the western states of Wyoming Territory, Utah Territory, Colorado and Idaho all won the vote by 1896, but eastern states resisted granting that right. Also an amendment to the Federal Constitution granting woman suffrage, failed to pass by the end of the 19th century.

For more info on women’s rights, visit there sites:
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/naw/nawstime.html
http://www.now.org/issues/economic/cea/ireland.html

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