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Archive for June, 2014

In my time travel romance, Thoroughly Modern Amanda, the heroine, Amanda Montgomery, longs for more freedom than a middle-class young woman is allowed in 1881 America.

When she meets a handsome hero from the 21st century, she longs to learn a way she can travel forward in time with him to experience true freedom.

The nineteenth century was a tumultuous time for the establishment of women’s rights, as women fought for their freedom at the same time many men sought to hold them back.

In 1870, the 15th Amendment gave voting rights to all men, including blacks, but women were excluded.

In 1845, a female reporter, Margaret Fuller, wrote ‘Women in the Nineteenth Century’. She insisted that “individuals had unlimited capacities and that when people’s roles were defined according to their sex, human development was severely limited”.

During the 19th century, women in the United States both organized and participated in many types of reform movements. They sought to improve education, initiate prison reform and ban alcoholic drinks; and in the pre-Civil War period, rallied to free the slaves.

In this time period, a woman speaking before a mixed audience, was frowned upon. But abolitionist sisters, Sarah and Angelina Grimke from South Carolina, spoke out against slavery in public meetings. A few of the male abolitionists, notably, William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips and Frederick Douglass were supportive of women speaking and participating in antislavery activities.

Women compared their position with that of slaves. Women and slaves were supposed to remain “passive, cooperative and obedient to their master-husbands”. Many feminists were also abolitionists, including Stanton, Lucy Stone, Lucretia Mott, Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth.

Dorothea Dix led a movement for prison reform in the mid 1800s. She also worked to provide mental-hospital care for the needy.

In July 1848 the first women’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, N. Y. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote that “all men and women are created equal” and that “the history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman”.

Women abolitionists were disappointed after the Union victory in the Civil War. They’d hoped the fight for freedom for blacks would also help advance women’s rights. However, the 14th and 15th Amendments granted citizenship and suffrage to black men, but women, whatever their color, were excluded.

Women finally did win the right to vote, but it was long hard struggle. Although women in the western states of Wyoming Territory, Utah Territory, Colorado and Idaho all won the vote by 1896, but eastern states resisted granting that right. Also an amendment to the Federal Constitution granting woman suffrage, failed to pass by the end of the 19th century.

For more info on women’s rights, visit:
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/naw/nawstime.html

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Next installment from second chapter of my time travel romance.

Excerpt:
ThoroughlyModernAmanda_w7277_750“I plan to speak to your father.” He lifted her hand and brushed his lips over her knuckles. Amanda’s breath quickened, but not with desire. She wanted to snatch her hand back, escape his office this minute.

“I’d like to show it to you tomorrow, if it’s all right,” he continued. “I’ll see you home then call on you before lunch.”

“I—I’m not sure how I’ll be feeling by morning.”

He patted her hand. “I’ll put in a few hours at the office then come to see how you’re doing.”

She nodded, although she had the urge to shout at him. Her father would be at the bank, though, so Randolph would have no chance to converse with him at least. He obviously wanted to ask Father for her hand.

All she wanted for now was to get home and crawl into bed. She didn’t want to speak to anyone, even her own family about her boss’s interest toward her. Although she knew her stepmother would be sympathetic to her plight, her father would likely deem this a fortuitous match for his daughter. But she wasn’t sure someone as old-fashioned as Randolph was what she wanted for a husband. She longed for a forward-thinking man like her father, who treated women as equals, not property. He’d always allowed her stepmother to speak her mind.

Thoroughly Modern Amanda is available from The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=176_135&products_id=5074

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Thoroughly-Modern-Amanda-ebook/dp/B00AQAIHHW/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355948640&sr=1-1&keywords=Thoroughy+Modern+Amanda

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thoroughly-modern-amanda-susan-macatee/1114008539?ean=2940016112596

All Romance Ebooks https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thoroughlymodernamanda-1026307-141.html

And now in print http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=191&products_id=5346

http://sneak-peek-sunday.blogspot.com/

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sarahjosephahaleIn my time travel romance, Thoroughly Modern Amanda, the heroine is employed as a writer for a weekly magazine and her step-mother is a novelist in late nineteenth century America.

Many women worked as writers in the late nineteenth century, either as newspaper reporters, magazine writers or novelists. One such women is Sarah Josepha Hale, editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book.

Born in 1788, Sarah J. Buell, grew up on a farm in New Hampshire. Her early education was limited as she was taught by her mother. But in later years, her brother, Horatio, who was a student at Dartmouth, started her on a course of self study.

Sarah married David Hale, a lawyer, who supported her continued education. The couple started a literary club and Sarah experimented with writing. When David died unexpectedly of pneumonia in 1822, Sarah set up a millinery business with her sister, Hannah, with the assistance of David’s Masonic colleagues. Sarah also published a book of poems with their aid, allowing her to leave the millinery business to write a novel.

Northwood met with success. The novel dealt directly with the timely issue of slavery.

Impressed by the book, the Reverend John Lauris Blake, an Episcopal minister and headmaster of the Cornhill School for Young Ladies, offered Sarah the editorship of a new magazine for women. Sarah left four of her five children to be taken in by relatives so she could relocate to Boston to pursue a career as an editor.

The Ladies Magazine and Literary Gazette was an American magazine, changing its name to American Ladies Magazine in 1834. Sarah saw the magazine as a platform to educate women. She wrote half of the contents of the magazine herself and all contributions were original works. Over the thirteen years she served as editor, she involved herself in social causes, including the Seaman’s Aid Society, fundraising for the Bunker Hill Monument and other education related causes.

Economic difficulties threatened the magazine in the late 1859corset1830’s, despite its success. Godey approached Sarah in 1836 to edit his Lady’s Book, but she wanted to continue working on her own publication and declined his offer. He then offered to buy her magazine, installing her as editor of the combined publication. She agreed, continuing to live in Boston, then moving to Philadelphia in 1841.

She continued to work toward the advancement of women, supporting Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell to fight her way into the male medical establishment. She also worked to support women who wanted to work as overseas missionaries and raised funds to preserve Mount Vernon. In addition, she lent aid to install female instructors in the new Vassar College.

Although Sarah didn’t heed the suffragist’s call for women to enter the political arena, she did continue her fight for women’s rights throughout her life. She was editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book until 1877, when the magazine was sold.

She died in 1879 at the age of ninety-one.

For more info on Sarah Josepha Hale, visit these sites:

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/godey/hale.html

http://www.womenwriters.net/domesticgoddess/hale1.html

http://www.librarycompany.org/women/portraits/hale.htm

Thoroughly Modern Amanda is available from The Wild Rose Press http://www.thewildrosepress.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=176_135&products_id=5074

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Thoroughly-Modern-Amanda-ebook/dp/B00AQAIHHW/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355948640&sr=1-1&keywords=Thoroughy+Modern+Amanda

And Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thoroughly-modern-amanda-susan-macatee/1114008539?ean=2940016112596

All Romance Ebooks https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thoroughlymodernamanda-1026307-141.html

And also in print from The Wild Rose Press and Amazon

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Installment from final scene in the second chapter of my time travel romance.

Excerpt:
April 6, 1881

ThoroughlyModernAmanda_w7277_750By day’s end, Amanda begged off Randolph’s invitation, claiming a headache. In truth, after he’d given away the coveted assignment, she couldn’t abide sitting for hours across the table from the man.

When he grasped her hand, she tried her best not to recoil.

“I’m sorry you’re not feeling well, my dear. Perhaps another time. But I do want to tell you about my surprise, if you could sit for just a minute, then I’ll see you home.”

Amanda gritted her teeth but slid into the seat he indicated at the side of his desk. “Randolph, I really don’t think—”

He cut her off. “I’m building a home on Wendover Street. It’s nearly complete.”

“A—a home?” Amanda didn’t understand why he thought this important to her, but then it dawned like a brick wall falling on her head.

Thoroughly Modern Amanda is available from The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=176_135&products_id=5074

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Thoroughly-Modern-Amanda-ebook/dp/B00AQAIHHW/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355948640&sr=1-1&keywords=Thoroughy+Modern+Amanda

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thoroughly-modern-amanda-susan-macatee/1114008539?ean=2940016112596

All Romance Ebooks https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thoroughlymodernamanda-1026307-141.html

And now in print http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=191&products_id=5346

http://sneak-peek-sunday.blogspot.com/

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Next installment from my time travel romance.

Excerpt:
ThoroughlyModernAmanda_w7277_750He rubbed his arms. A sudden chill gripped him.

Must be nerves.

He circled the empty room, running his hand along the walls. In spots, the wallpaper and plaster had literally rotted away, exposing rotted wood beams. If only he’d had the chance to restore this house. He’d have done Mrs. Grayson proud.

“Enough self-pity,” he said aloud. “Time to go.”

He stepped to the doorway, but a creak followed by a groaning and a loud crack, stayed him.

Something hard and heavy clipped his head. Pain radiated like a white-hot light, and he fell.

Thoroughly Modern Amanda is available from The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=176_135&products_id=5074

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Thoroughly-Modern-Amanda-ebook/dp/B00AQAIHHW/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355948640&sr=1-1&keywords=Thoroughy+Modern+Amanda

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thoroughly-modern-amanda-susan-macatee/1114008539?ean=2940016112596

All Romance Ebooks https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-thoroughlymodernamanda-1026307-141.html

And now in print http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=191&products_id=5346

http://sneak-peek-sunday.blogspot.com/

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My first full-length romance was a Civil War time travel published, and still available, from The Wild Rose Press in 2009. Time travel is my favorite genre of romance. What’s yours?

ErinsRebel_w1957_300Philadelphia newspaper reporter, Erin Branigan, is engaged to marry an up-and-coming lawyer, but dreams of a man from the past, a Civil War captain, change her plans and start her on a journey beyond time. After a car accident, Erin wakes to find herself living in the 1860s in a Confederate army camp.

Captain Will Montgomery, the man of her dreams, is now a flesh and blood Rebel soldier who sets her soul aflame. But the Irish beauty holds a secret he needs to unravel before he can place his trust in her.

Can she correct a mistake made long ago that caused his death and denied her the love she was meant to have? Or is she doomed to live out her life with nothing but regret?

Excerpt:

As he moved closer, her knees turned to jelly. Strong, hard-muscled arms embraced her, offering support. Her head spun. She lifted a hand to stop the motion and encountered wool, a double row of metal buttons and a rock-hard chest. The enticing aroma of sandalwood mixed with a musky, masculine scent, plus a tinge of wood smoke invaded her senses. Had she hit her head harder than she’d thought?

She gazed at his lightly tanned face. Firm lips tilted upward slightly at the corners surrounded by a thin chocolate-colored mustache curving into a neatly-trimmed beard covering only his chin. Thick, dark hair brushed his collar and curled from beneath a broad-brimmed black hat. Her pulse raced as she leaned against his long, solid frame. Night after night in her dreams she’d run her hands through those curls.

“How can you be here?” she murmured.

“Pardon me, ma’am?”

“I don’t understand.” She tried to wrench from his grasp, but he gathered her close, lifting her into his arms. “What are you doing?”

“Taking you back where you belong.” He carried her to the tent entrance where Doc peered out.

“Will, what the devil is going on?”

“I assume you didn’t give Mrs. O’Connell permission to leave.”

“I did not.” He scowled. “I told you to rest.”

The dark-haired man carried her inside and laid her on the cot. She propped herself on an elbow to get a better view of the man Doc called Will. Broad shoulders tapered into a narrow waist accentuated by the cut of his gray frock coat trimmed in gold braid.

“Who the hell are you?” she asked.

“Pardon me, ma’am?”

His gaze chilled her blood. He looked exactly like the man in the antique photo she’d found between the pages of her grandmother’s Bible. If he were the man in the photo, where was she? Maybe the crash had killed her, and she was now in the afterlife. And like the man who called himself Doc, this man had also called her Mrs. O’Connell. Grandma Rose’s great-aunt. Something wasn’t right.

Unable to voice her fears, she stared open-mouthed at the man.

“Will,” Doc said. “I think Mrs. O’Connell’s having trouble with her memory.”

“Her memory?”

“The fall from the horse,” Doc explained, “seems to have affected her memory — even her speech. Her nose was bleeding a bit, and she has a fair-sized lump on the back of her head.”

Will frowned.

Erin’s mind reeled. This couldn’t be the same man she’d researched.

The men looked at her, waiting for a response.

“How many times do I have to tell you?” she said. “I was never on a horse.” She squeezed her eyes shut as the pain increased, then blinked furiously so she could focus.

Doc glanced at Will as if to confirm his diagnosis, then pressed a cool, damp towel against her forehead.

“Ma’am.” Will removed his hat. “I would advise you to stay put until Doc says you can go back to your tent.”

“I don’t have a tent,” she grated between clenched teeth.

The men exchanged glances.

“It’s worse than I thought,” Doc said.

“You say the fall affected her speech?” Will scowled.

“There’s no other way to explain it.”

“What’s wrong with the way I talk?” she asked.

“You’ve lost your lilting brogue, for one thing,” Will said, “unless that was an act.”

She stretched out on the cot, as her stomach lurched again. “Look. All I want to do is go home.”

“This is your home,” Will said, “since you signed on as camp laundress two weeks ago. Or have you forgotten that, too?”

“No, you don’t understand —”

“Are you having second thoughts, Mrs. O’Connell?”

“I told you, I’m not—” She froze in mid-sentence. They would never believe she wasn’t Erin O’Connell.

Despite the pain slicing through her head, she slowly sat up. “I need a mirror.”

Doc glanced at Will.

“A mirror!” she repeated. Her heart hammered in overdrive, and her head felt ready to explode. Doc rummaged among the contents on the table, producing a small, wood-framed hand mirror.

Blinking back the blinding pain, she stared at her reflection. Her own eyes stared back, wide and bright blue. The face was hers, yet it wasn’t. The cheeks were a bit rounder. Her skin was pale. No make-up. Red-gold hair tumbled over her shoulders.

Touching her neck, she noted the maroon-checked dress she wore was topped with a starched, white collar stained with blood. She fingered a small, ivory-stoned brooch at her throat.

In the photo, her Civil War relative had worn her hair parted in the center and pulled back off her face, but otherwise, she was looking at a live portrait of her great-great-great-aunt. Erin O’Connell – Federal spy.

Civil War time travel romance, Erin’s Rebel, was a finalist Ancient City Romance Authors 2010 Reader’s Choice Award, paranormal category.

Read opening chapters and reviews at my website: http://susanmacatee.com/mybooks.html

Erin’s Rebel is available from Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Erins-Rebel-ebook/dp/B002MCZUWM/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1307644938&sr=1-1

Barnes and Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/erins-rebel-susan-macatee/1017203009?ean=2940043330673&itm=1&usri=erins%2brebel

The Wild Rose Press http://www.wildrosepublishing.com/maincatalog_v151/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=89_117&products_id=3554

and All Romance Ebooks
http://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-erin039srebel-80339-141.html

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In my 2012 American Victorian romance novel, Cassidy’s War, the heroine, Cassidy Stuart, aspires to attend medical school in an era where female physicians were highly discouraged.

After applying and being rejected from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, she applied to a college established just for women to study to be doctors. Although my story is fiction, the college is real and existed in the time period of the story.

Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania was founded in 1850 in Philadelphia. Originally, it was known as the Female Medical School of Pennsylvania. This school was the first medical school for women. The school offered its students a respected MD degree. Prior to this women practicing medicine were midwives or trained in homeopathic methods.

At its start, the college faced much opposition, but gained respectability when a member of the first graduating class, Anne Preston, M.D. founded the Women’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

One of the founders of Female Medical, Joseph P. Longshore, told the first eight graduating students “this day forms an eventful epoch in the history of your lives, in the history of woman, in the history of the race.”

Longshore, a Quaker, opposed slavery and was a champion of women’s rights. His sister-in-law, Hannah Longshore, was a graduate of the first class and served as a “demonstrator in anatomy.”

The Women’s Hospital of Philadelphia was founded by a group of Quaker women in 1861, because women were denied access to most forms of hospital training, including surgery. Emeline Horton Cleveland, the first resident of Woman’s Hospital, became one of the first women surgeons in the U.S. and performed major gynecologic procedures.

The Philadelphia and Pennsylvania medical societies would not admit Women’s Medical College graduates. Those graduates were even banned from consulting with women physicians.

In 1875, graduates formed an Alumnae Association. By 1895, they had 300 members. These women supported and defended the college during a difficult period. The college expanded in laboratory offerings in the 1890s. The alumnae offered free care to poor women and children, and more “clinical material” to its present students, as well as graduates.

Despite opposition and financial problems, the historic women’s school survived the early 20th century through alumnae support. And this was in an era where other women’s medical schools were closing.

It wasn’t until 1969 that the college was forced to admit male students to ease financial pressures.

For more info about Female and Women’s Medical and early training for women physicians, visit there sites:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1448257 http://www.examiner.com/colleges-in-philadelphia/the-history-of-women-s-medical-college-of-pennsylvania

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